mymodernmet:

Turkish company Pugedon recently introduced an ingenious recycling box that’s an innovative way to help both the environment and stray animals. It releases food for the city’s stray dogs and cats every time a plastic bottle is deposited, and it allows people to empty their water bottles for the animals as well. This wonderful service operates at no charge to the city because the recycled plastic pays for the cost of food.

steppen-wolf:

The raven is sometimes known as “the wolf-bird.” Ravens, like many other animals, scavenge at wolf kills, but there’s more to it than that. Both wolves and ravens have the ability to form social attachments and they seem to have evolved over many years to form these attachments with each other, to both species’ benefit.There are a couple of theories as to why wolves and ravens end up at the same carcasses. One is that because ravens can fly, they are better at finding carcasses than wolves are. But they can’t get to the food once they get there, because they can’t open up the carcass. So they’ll make a lot of noise, and then wolves will come and use their sharp teeth and strong jaws to make the food accessible not just to themselves, but also to the ravens.Ravens have also been observed circling a sick elk or moose and calling out, possibly alerting wolves to an easy kill. The other theory is that ravens respond to the howls of wolves preparing to hunt (and, for that matter, to human hunters shooting guns). They find out where the wolves are going and following. Both theories may be correct.Wolves and ravens also play. A raven will sneak up behind a wolf and yank its tail and the wolf will play back. Ravens sometimes respond to wolf howls with calls of their own, resulting in a concert of howls and calls. 

steppen-wolf:

The raven is sometimes known as “the wolf-bird.” Ravens, like many other animals, scavenge at wolf kills, but there’s more to it than that. Both wolves and ravens have the ability to form social attachments and they seem to have evolved over many years to form these attachments with each other, to both species’ benefit.

There are a couple of theories as to why wolves and ravens end up at the same carcasses. One is that because ravens can fly, they are better at finding carcasses than wolves are. But they can’t get to the food once they get there, because they can’t open up the carcass. So they’ll make a lot of noise, and then wolves will come and use their sharp teeth and strong jaws to make the food accessible not just to themselves, but also to the ravens.

Ravens have also been observed circling a sick elk or moose and calling out, possibly alerting wolves to an easy kill. The other theory is that ravens respond to the howls of wolves preparing to hunt (and, for that matter, to human hunters shooting guns). They find out where the wolves are going and following. Both theories may be correct.

Wolves and ravens also play. A raven will sneak up behind a wolf and yank its tail and the wolf will play back. Ravens sometimes respond to wolf howls with calls of their own, resulting in a concert of howls and calls. 

(via charnanigans)

So much YES for most of these animal choices.

(via ironfries)

odditiesoflife:

Two-Headed Animals

This bizarre condition is called polycephaly, and believe it or not, it can occur in both animals and humans. The most common cause for animals with two heads is monozygotic (identical) twins failing to separate properly, so that instead of becoming two separate siblings, they end up sharing the same body. Many animals and humans born with polycephaly die soon after birth, but not all.

But for the kitten and pig pictured above, there is another disorder that caused the appearance of their two-heads. Its called diprosopus, or craniofacial duplication. And unlike polycephaly, diprosopus has nothing to do with the separation of embryos. Its cause is due to a protein called the sonic hedgehog homolog protein, also known as SHH. SHH basically tells the cranial and facial region how to develop when an embryo is growing. Too much can cause the face to end up being extra wide, with duplicated features; too little, and you could end up with a Cyclops.

thekidshouldseethis:

Koalas running. Koalas eating. Koalas clinging to legs. Koalas nose to nose. Koalas being ridiculously cute.

In an ongoing series, Koala HospitalNational Geographic travels to Port Macquarie, Australia, a few hours from Sydney, to visit the 40-year-old refuge for wild koalas. Volunteers there are clearly delighted at the chance to frolic with the fluffy marsupials, who cling adorably to tree branches and human legs alike. If you can’t make the trek but you want to contribute, you can adopt a wild koala via the hospital’s website, or help them plant a food tree, to counteract the koalas’ loss of habitat. 

via The Atlantic.

theoddmentemporium:

The Strange World of Professor Copperthwaite

The Strange World of Professor Copperthwaite was a taxidermy collection of all manner of weird and wonderful creatures billed in the 19th century as having been brought to the UK by the fictional Victorian adventurer Professor Copperthwaite. The collection includes bizarre stuffed animals including [2-7] a unicorn, a bat-duck hybrid, a winged cat, a “cheasant” or “phicken”, a Cambodian woolly pig, and a yeti. It is thought Victorians were fooled by these mythical creatures because they appeared alongside real animals and other curiosities such as conjoined lambs.

(via odditiesoflife)

thekidshouldseethis:

From the BBC series Life, meet the Sarcastic Fringehead as Sir David Attenborough narrates. 

More from Discovery.com

This small, scrappy fish found along the Pacific Coast from San Francisco to Baja California, Mexico, maintains a relatively small zone of personal space around its home, usually a shell, a can or a bottle. When an intruder invades that space, the fringehead attacks fearlessly and aggressively, baring its teeth and snapping its jaws… 

Why invest so much time and energy into keeping away unwanted solicitations? Because in the fringehead’s preferred habitat — on sandy or muddy ocean bottoms just beyond the breaker zone — competition for resources is fierce. To ensure they get their fair share of food and space, fringeheads stake out a territory that they can realistically defend… Some scientists estimate they consume almost 14 times their body weight per year.

via Neatorama.

wildbeardedbrownmanontheinternet:

roarandthings:

mira-of-sassgard:

I lost my shit at self-governing snakes.

I lost my shit at self-governing snakes, but then I calmed down and found it (it’s always in the last place you look). I lost it again when I found out the toad only thinks of me as a friend. 


the shit was last seen here. It has since been lost.

wildbeardedbrownmanontheinternet:

roarandthings:

mira-of-sassgard:

I lost my shit at self-governing snakes.

I lost my shit at self-governing snakes, but then I calmed down and found it (it’s always in the last place you look). I lost it again when I found out the toad only thinks of me as a friend. 

the shit was last seen here. It has since been lost.

(via gyzym)

nataliehall:

Wolves.

nataliehall:

Wolves.