thekidshouldseethis:

In collaboration with the World Wildlife Fund, National Geographic just released a video explaining the impact of a cotton t-shirt: how much water it takes to make just one, how much energy it takes to grow, manufacture, and transport that shirt, and how much water and energy it takes to care for that shirt in your home. The video also explains how we can make a difference in reducing the resources used in care for that shirt: 

One load of washing uses 40 gallons of water. One load of drying uses 5 times more energy than washing. In fact, skipping the ironing and drying of your t-shirt, saves a third of its carbon footprint.

Whether it’s reducing waste, saving energy, or being a conscious consumer, small actions can make a big difference. Think about ways that you could save energy and water.

Interested in a few changes that makes an impact?

1. Buy and share second-hand clothes. Related watching: Jessi Arrington’s Wearing Nothing New TedTalk about buying thrift store clothing. Two favorite quotes: “Color is powerful. It is almost physiologically impossible to be in a bad mood when you’re wearing bright red pants.” and ”Fitting in is way overrated.” 

2. Buy a drying rack at a local store and let the sun (or the heat in your house) do all of the work!

Watch more videos about conservation here.

Period Costume Porn
» Heavenly Highgarden (suggested by hoganmclaughlin)

(via ashinan)

thekidshouldseethis:

At a Portland TEDx event, Oregonian Joe Smith demonstrates how to use a paper towel, and moreover, demonstrates how easy it is to be mindful. Everyone should see this!

via Kottke.

thekidshouldseethis:

William Kamkwamba’s story is already out there as a book, a young readers book, a Kickstarter documentary film project, not only one but two TED Talks, and luckily for us, the six minute story in video form. A description of that story: 

Enchanted by the workings of electricity as a boy, William had a goal to study science in Malawi’s top boarding schools. But in 2002, his country was stricken with a famine that left his family’s farm devastated and his parents destitute. Unable to pay the eighty-dollar-a-year tuition for his education, William was forced to drop out and help his family forage for food as thousands across the country starved and died.

Yet William refused to let go of his dreams. With nothing more than a fistful of cornmeal in his stomach, a small pile of once-forgotten science textbooks, and an armory of curiosity and determination, he embarked on a daring plan to bring his family a set of luxuries that only two percent of Malawians could afford and what the West considers a necessity—electricity and running water. Using scrap metal, tractor parts, and bicycle halves, William forged a crude yet operable windmill, an unlikely contraption and small miracle that eventually powered four lights, complete with homemade switches and a circuit breaker made from nails and wire. A second machine turned a water pump that could battle the drought and famine that loomed with every season.

Soon, news of William’s magetsi a mphepo—his “electric wind”—spread beyond the borders of his home, and the boy who was once called crazy became an inspiration to those around the world.

We love windmills and really love William’s drive and ingenuity. This is exactly what the kid should see.

thekidshouldseethis:

Now this is an environmentally-friendly and resourceful improvement on a scarecrow! It seems that, without the use of harmful chemicals, this Japanese farmer came up with a simple system to keep local crows from eating the vegetable patch.How? Things are kept moving and shaking around the growing plants using that roaring little river next to the farm. Follow the strings! 

via ScienceDump.