cherrypinkstraws:

Looks like Twitter Japan has been having quite much fun with Hanyu’s performance.

cherrypinkstraws:

Looks like Twitter Japan has been having quite much fun with Hanyu’s performance.

(via quillotine)

antiquity-dreams:

It’s Naru and I in Japan on Day 1. It’s a little all over the place but I find it amusing. Which.. is good because someone has to. XD

neil-gaiman:

luminarystudies:

In Onahama following the catastrophic earthquake that happened two years ago the Okurie project was launched. The project had a goal of painting murals on buildings which were scheduled to be demolished because of the earthquake.”

-Creative Greed

Except that it looks rather reminiscent of bloody handprints in a zombie film… Some kind of interesting beautiful horror.

Beautiful…

The Japanese would do “bloody handprints in a zombie film making incredibly beautiful scene of sakura.”  AND THERE WOULD BE A METAPHOR THAT WAS SO SUBTLE YET SO OBVIOUS THAT WHEN YOU FINALLY UNDERSTOOD IT FELT LIKE YOU’D BEEN PUNCHED IN THE BRAIN.  WITH BEAUTY.

jumpingjacktrash:

neurosciencestuff:

Japan’s Robot Suit Gets Global Safety Certificate
A robot suit that can help the elderly or disabled get around was given its global safety certificate in Japan on Wednesday, paving the way for its worldwide rollout.
The Hybrid Assistive Limb, or HAL, is a power-assisted pair of legs developed by Japanese robot maker Cyberdyne, which has also developed similar robot arms.
A quality assurance body issued the certificate based on a draft version of an international safety standard for personal robots that is expected to be approved later this year, the ministry for the economy, trade and industry said.
The metal-and-plastic exoskeleton has become the first nursing-care robot certified under the draft standard, a ministry official said. Battery-powered HAL, which detects muscle impulses to anticipate and support the user’s body movements, is designed to help the elderly with mobility or help hospital or nursing carers to lift patients.
Cyberdyne, based in Tsukuba, northeast of Tokyo, has so far leased some 330 suits to 150 hospitals, welfare and other facilities in Japan since 2010, at 178,000 yen ($1,950) per suit per year.
“It is very significant that Japan has obtained this certification before others in the world,” said Yoshiyuki Sankai, the head of Cyberdyne.
The company is unrelated to the firm of the same name responsible for the cyborg assassin played by Arnold Schwarzenegger in the 1984 film “The Terminator”.
“This is a first step forward for Japan, the great robot nation, to send our message to the world about robots of the future,” said Sankai, who is also a professor at Tsukuba University.
A different version of HAL — coincidentally the name of the evil supercomputer in Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey” — has been developed for workers who need to wear heavy radiation protection as part of the clean-up at the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant.
Industrial robots have long been used in Japan, and robo-suits are gradually making inroads into hospitals and retirement homes.
But critics say the government has been slow in creating a safety framework for such robots in a country whose rapidly-ageing population is expected to enjoy ever longer lives.

can we just take a moment to appreciate the phrase ‘the great robot nation’
thank you

jumpingjacktrash:

neurosciencestuff:

Japan’s Robot Suit Gets Global Safety Certificate

A robot suit that can help the elderly or disabled get around was given its global safety certificate in Japan on Wednesday, paving the way for its worldwide rollout.

The Hybrid Assistive Limb, or HAL, is a power-assisted pair of legs developed by Japanese robot maker Cyberdyne, which has also developed similar robot arms.

A quality assurance body issued the certificate based on a draft version of an international safety standard for personal robots that is expected to be approved later this year, the ministry for the economy, trade and industry said.

The metal-and-plastic exoskeleton has become the first nursing-care robot certified under the draft standard, a ministry official said. Battery-powered HAL, which detects muscle impulses to anticipate and support the user’s body movements, is designed to help the elderly with mobility or help hospital or nursing carers to lift patients.

Cyberdyne, based in Tsukuba, northeast of Tokyo, has so far leased some 330 suits to 150 hospitals, welfare and other facilities in Japan since 2010, at 178,000 yen ($1,950) per suit per year.

“It is very significant that Japan has obtained this certification before others in the world,” said Yoshiyuki Sankai, the head of Cyberdyne.

The company is unrelated to the firm of the same name responsible for the cyborg assassin played by Arnold Schwarzenegger in the 1984 film “The Terminator”.

“This is a first step forward for Japan, the great robot nation, to send our message to the world about robots of the future,” said Sankai, who is also a professor at Tsukuba University.

A different version of HAL — coincidentally the name of the evil supercomputer in Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey” — has been developed for workers who need to wear heavy radiation protection as part of the clean-up at the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant.

Industrial robots have long been used in Japan, and robo-suits are gradually making inroads into hospitals and retirement homes.

But critics say the government has been slow in creating a safety framework for such robots in a country whose rapidly-ageing population is expected to enjoy ever longer lives.

can we just take a moment to appreciate the phrase ‘the great robot nation’

thank you

(via charnanigans)

odditiesoflife:

Sokushinbutsu - The Bizarre Practice of Self-Mummification

Scattered throughout Northern Japan around the Yamagata Prefecture are two dozen mummified Japanese monks known as Sokushinbutsu, who caused their own deaths by way of self-mummification. A successful mummification took upwards of ten years. It is believed that many hundreds of monks tried, but only about 20 such mummifications have been discovered to date.

The elaborate process started with three years of eating a special diet consisting only of nuts and seeds, while taking part in a regimen of rigorous physical activity that stripped them of their body fat. They then ate only bark and roots for another three years and began drinking a poisonous tea made from the sap of the Urushi tree, normally used to lacquer bowls.

This caused vomiting and a rapid loss of bodily fluids, and most importantly, it made the body too poisonous to be eaten by maggots. Finally, a self-mummifying monk would lock himself in a stone tomb barely larger than his body, where he would not move from the lotus position. His only connection to the outside world was an air tube and a bell. Each day he rang a bell to let those outside know that he was still alive.

When the bell stopped ringing, the tube was removed and the tomb sealed. After the tomb was sealed, the other monks in the temple would wait another three years, and open the tomb to see if the mummification was successful. If the monk had been successfully mummified, they were immediately seen as a Buddha and put in the temple for viewing. Usually, though, there was just a decomposed body.

odditiesoflife:

Vintage Japanese Mermaids

Reports of mermaid encounters were not uncommon in 19th-century Japan, and a number of illustrated documents from that period — including a few by notable natural historians — depict some fantastic specimens rarely seen in today’s world.

(via odditiesoflife)

saroux:

miyuyoshida:

Sukebans, Late 1960’s to Late 1970’s
Tokyo, 1972
A pack of tough-looking teenagers sits smoking cigarettes in a huddle near a Japan Railways train station. Everything about them, including their style of speech, is tough as nails. Hands clutch barely concealed weapons, including razors and steel chains, should a fight break out. And it’s only a matter of time until one does. Their collective body language bristles with a threat of imminent violence. Local yakuza gangsters proctecting their turf? Neighborhood bad boys daring straight, polite Japanese society to knock the chip off their shoulders? Well, almost. It’s a group of schoolgirls known as the Sukeban, Japan’s very first all-girl gangs. 

Read More

saroux:

miyuyoshida:

Sukebans, Late 1960’s to Late 1970’s

Tokyo, 1972

A pack of tough-looking teenagers sits smoking cigarettes in a huddle near a Japan Railways train station. Everything about them, including their style of speech, is tough as nails. Hands clutch barely concealed weapons, including razors and steel chains, should a fight break out. And it’s only a matter of time until one does. Their collective body language bristles with a threat of imminent violence. Local yakuza gangsters proctecting their turf? Neighborhood bad boys daring straight, polite Japanese society to knock the chip off their shoulders? Well, almost. It’s a group of schoolgirls known as the Sukeban, Japan’s very first all-girl gangs. 

Read More

thekidshouldseethis:

Reincarnation, an animation from Japanese illustrator Chie Miyazaki.

via Youngna.

Related watching: USAWALTZ by Asami Ike.

thekidshouldseethis:

Now this is an environmentally-friendly and resourceful improvement on a scarecrow! It seems that, without the use of harmful chemicals, this Japanese farmer came up with a simple system to keep local crows from eating the vegetable patch.How? Things are kept moving and shaking around the growing plants using that roaring little river next to the farm. Follow the strings! 

via ScienceDump.