jtotheizzoe:

What The Night Sky Will Look Like Over the Next 7 Billion Years

Here’s a little-known fact: If our eyes were sensitive enough, the Andromeda galaxy would be wider than the Moon in the night sky. 

Another little-known fact: That same Andromeda galaxy, the Milky Way’s closest neighbor, is on a collision course with our spiral home. Starting in 3.5 billion years or so, our galaxies will smack into each other. Galaxies are mostly empty space, so it won’t be as catastrophic as you might imagine, but it will certainly change the organization of the stars.

This video is what the night sky may look like as Andromeda gets closer, since none of us will be around to see it. Also, be sure to check out this timeline of the far future.

(via PetaPixel)

(via candidlycara)

jtotheizzoe:

Why is there a “b” in doubt?

The sound of a word is only part of its story. There’s usually secrets of the word’s history locked in its spelling. Even if it seems random.

By educator Gina Cooke for TEDEducation.

(via candidlycara)

thefruityboots:

justkiddstuff:

fitvillains:

“There’s Only One Thing To Do When The Internet Calls You Fat”

wow this is amazing. i teared up at the end. 

Mean people are suffering.

(via hermititude)

thekidshouldseethis:

Further Up Yonder: A Message From ISS To All Humankind by film student Giacomo Sardelli, using images and audio messages courtesy of NASA. The video’s transcript: 

As the most forward deployed citizens of the planet at this moment, and the first expedition crew aboard Space Station Alpha, we are well started on our journey of exploration and discovery, building a foothold for men and women who will voyage and live in places far away from our home planet. We are opening a gateway to space for all humankind.

As we orbit the planet every 90 minutes, we see a world without borders and send our wish that all nations will work towards peace and harmony. Our world has changed dramatically, still the ISS is the physical proof that nations can work together in harmony and should promote peace and global cooperation, and rich goals that are simply out of this world.

On this night, we would like to share with all, our good fortune on this space adventure, our wonder and excitement as we gaze on the Earth’s splendor, and our strong sense that the human spirit to do, to explore, to discover has no limit. 

Times are hard all over the world, but this is a time when we can all think about being together and treasuring our planet, and we have a pretty nice view of it up here.

via @ReidGower.

thekidshouldseethis:

Oh, the pitter patter of little feet… all kinds of feet! Watch this smooth-moving, life-like PhantomX Hexapod robot, invented (and recorded) by kinematics expert Kåre Halvorsen, as his kids play around with it.

via Kottke.

PS. More robots!

What is the  ITU? What does it mean for the future of the Internet? https://whatistheitu.org

thekidshouldseethis:

At a Portland TEDx event, Oregonian Joe Smith demonstrates how to use a paper towel, and moreover, demonstrates how easy it is to be mindful. Everyone should see this!

via Kottke.

thekidshouldseethis:

There are two dromedary camels that live in Arizona that are now internet famous: their names are Nessie and Baby. You can tell that they are Dromedary or Arabian camels because they have only one hump (vs two. And, despite cartoon lore, they do not store water in it, but they do drink a lot of water.) 

Nessie and Baby get brushed and cuddled, they race, and they run from “dangerous” plastic bins, among many other activities like pineapple eating

Baby and Nessie are just two of the animals at Camels and Friends.

thekidshouldseethis:

Don’t adjust your sound as this video has none, but wow, does it have a picture! This is a deepstaria enigmatica, a deep-sea jellyfish that was caught by a remotely operated underwater camera about 5000 feet (1500 m) down. Wikipedia places them “in Antarctic and near-Antarctic seas” and puts their size at “approx. 60 cm” (or almost 2 feet) wide. Impressive, nature. Impressive.

via io9.

thekidshouldseethis:

What an excellent video for kids to see: one of their own growing from a baby to a 12 year old.

This video has gone viral since linked on Reddit… Frans Hofmeester recorded video of Lotte, his daughter, every week from birth until 12 years old. He also recorded his son Vince, a fun video with more faces, props and videogame style music. Both kids loved both of these time lapse revelations.

via Viral Viral Videos

Previously: Irina Werning’s Back to the Future