mercy-angel-09:

minim-calibre:

the-mamishka:

solarbird:

Scarecrow Video has been a Seattle institution for many years. It started as a video rental store – and still is one – but it was owned by the kind of crazed film fanatics who run a business primarily as a way to build the biggest collection of things imaginable. The original owner was the sort of person who would fly on an hour’s notice to former Soviet republics on the rumour that he could get a SECAM videotape copy of a particular obscure Stalinist-era Belorussian film. And half the time, he’d return with it.
Despite having one of the largest film collections in the world – possibly the largest in the world – video rental doesn’t cut it anymore, so they’re going non-profit. But that’s expensive, too, so they’re launching a Kickstarter to make it happen. Go help.
I started renting from them when they were next to J&S Phonograph Needles in Roosevelt – yes that was a store for phonograph needles it didn’t make much sense them either – and remember when they moved to the U. District, on 50th and Roosevelt. They bought out what used to be the biggest Radio Shack ever, a multistory building with its own screening lounge and everything.
It’s pretty damn cool, and it’d be a disaster to lose such a comprehensive film collection – particularly as it is actually available to the public. Even the exotic stuff can be rented and/or screened – they have multiformat players available, too. In some cases, they have one of only three to four copies of films still in existence, and you can see it. That’s the kind of collection this is.
I’ve known one of the current owners for a long time; this project is a big deal for them, too. So go help them flip that switch to non-profit. As I write this, they’ve made 60% of goal in a day, thanks in no small part to The Onion‘s AV Club. Let’s see if we can’t get them there by tomorrow, eh?
Mirrored from Crime and the Blog of Evil. Come check out our music!

Wow. I was just going to write a post about this myself, having just learned about the Kickstarter the other day, but now I don’t have to because Solarbird has said it all! 
For the record, I have been a long time employee of Scarecrow Video and it is the most amazing place for movies there is. It should be a historic landmark in Seattle! Let’s help keep it alive and kicking!!

Two of our good friends, including our best man at our wedding, were managers at Scarecrow for years. It’s where one of them met his wife. She was a customer, he was the cute, oblivious guy behind the counter. Fifteen years or so and two kids later, they’re still adorable enough together to be worth a movie of their own.
Scarecrow is more than just a video store, as indicated above. It’s a comprehensive collection of film and television from around the globe made accessible. When I say around the globe, I mean it, by the way. Their international section is glorious. 
Keeping that vision alive, well, that’s huge.
My email update this morning says they’re at about 70% after day one. (Brian and Ed were on this basically instantly yesterday, passing the news and the Kickstarter link along to the rest of us, which is pretty amazing, considering I think Ed’s still driving a moving van out to DC right now.)
If you’ve got a buck or five to spare for arts preservation, trust me: this is worth it. 

This place is absolutely AMAZING. If you want it, chances are they have it. I would hate for it to disappear.

mercy-angel-09:

minim-calibre:

the-mamishka:

solarbird:

Scarecrow Video has been a Seattle institution for many years. It started as a video rental store – and still is one – but it was owned by the kind of crazed film fanatics who run a business primarily as a way to build the biggest collection of things imaginable. The original owner was the sort of person who would fly on an hour’s notice to former Soviet republics on the rumour that he could get a SECAM videotape copy of a particular obscure Stalinist-era Belorussian film. And half the time, he’d return with it.

Despite having one of the largest film collections in the world – possibly the largest in the world – video rental doesn’t cut it anymore, so they’re going non-profit. But that’s expensive, too, so they’re launching a Kickstarter to make it happen. Go help.

I started renting from them when they were next to J&S Phonograph Needles in Roosevelt – yes that was a store for phonograph needles it didn’t make much sense them either – and remember when they moved to the U. District, on 50th and Roosevelt. They bought out what used to be the biggest Radio Shack ever, a multistory building with its own screening lounge and everything.

It’s pretty damn cool, and it’d be a disaster to lose such a comprehensive film collection – particularly as it is actually available to the public. Even the exotic stuff can be rented and/or screened – they have multiformat players available, too. In some cases, they have one of only three to four copies of films still in existence, and you can see it. That’s the kind of collection this is.

I’ve known one of the current owners for a long time; this project is a big deal for them, too. So go help them flip that switch to non-profit. As I write this, they’ve made 60% of goal in a day, thanks in no small part to The Onion‘s AV Club. Let’s see if we can’t get them there by tomorrow, eh?

Mirrored from Crime and the Blog of Evil. Come check out our music!

Wow. I was just going to write a post about this myself, having just learned about the Kickstarter the other day, but now I don’t have to because Solarbird has said it all! 

For the record, I have been a long time employee of Scarecrow Video and it is the most amazing place for movies there is. It should be a historic landmark in Seattle! Let’s help keep it alive and kicking!!

Two of our good friends, including our best man at our wedding, were managers at Scarecrow for years. It’s where one of them met his wife. She was a customer, he was the cute, oblivious guy behind the counter. Fifteen years or so and two kids later, they’re still adorable enough together to be worth a movie of their own.

Scarecrow is more than just a video store, as indicated above. It’s a comprehensive collection of film and television from around the globe made accessible. When I say around the globe, I mean it, by the way. Their international section is glorious. 

Keeping that vision alive, well, that’s huge.

My email update this morning says they’re at about 70% after day one. (Brian and Ed were on this basically instantly yesterday, passing the news and the Kickstarter link along to the rest of us, which is pretty amazing, considering I think Ed’s still driving a moving van out to DC right now.)

If you’ve got a buck or five to spare for arts preservation, trust me: this is worth it. 

This place is absolutely AMAZING. If you want it, chances are they have it. I would hate for it to disappear.

(via paper-flowers)

jtotheizzoe:

What The Night Sky Will Look Like Over the Next 7 Billion Years

Here’s a little-known fact: If our eyes were sensitive enough, the Andromeda galaxy would be wider than the Moon in the night sky. 

Another little-known fact: That same Andromeda galaxy, the Milky Way’s closest neighbor, is on a collision course with our spiral home. Starting in 3.5 billion years or so, our galaxies will smack into each other. Galaxies are mostly empty space, so it won’t be as catastrophic as you might imagine, but it will certainly change the organization of the stars.

This video is what the night sky may look like as Andromeda gets closer, since none of us will be around to see it. Also, be sure to check out this timeline of the far future.

(via PetaPixel)

(via carazelaya)

jtotheizzoe:

Why is there a “b” in doubt?

The sound of a word is only part of its story. There’s usually secrets of the word’s history locked in its spelling. Even if it seems random.

By educator Gina Cooke for TEDEducation.

(via carazelaya)

thefruityboots:

justkiddstuff:

fitvillains:

“There’s Only One Thing To Do When The Internet Calls You Fat”

wow this is amazing. i teared up at the end. 

Mean people are suffering.

(via hermititude-deactivated20140426)

thekidshouldseethis:

Further Up Yonder: A Message From ISS To All Humankind by film student Giacomo Sardelli, using images and audio messages courtesy of NASA. The video’s transcript: 

As the most forward deployed citizens of the planet at this moment, and the first expedition crew aboard Space Station Alpha, we are well started on our journey of exploration and discovery, building a foothold for men and women who will voyage and live in places far away from our home planet. We are opening a gateway to space for all humankind.

As we orbit the planet every 90 minutes, we see a world without borders and send our wish that all nations will work towards peace and harmony. Our world has changed dramatically, still the ISS is the physical proof that nations can work together in harmony and should promote peace and global cooperation, and rich goals that are simply out of this world.

On this night, we would like to share with all, our good fortune on this space adventure, our wonder and excitement as we gaze on the Earth’s splendor, and our strong sense that the human spirit to do, to explore, to discover has no limit. 

Times are hard all over the world, but this is a time when we can all think about being together and treasuring our planet, and we have a pretty nice view of it up here.

via @ReidGower.

thekidshouldseethis:

Oh, the pitter patter of little feet… all kinds of feet! Watch this smooth-moving, life-like PhantomX Hexapod robot, invented (and recorded) by kinematics expert Kåre Halvorsen, as his kids play around with it.

via Kottke.

PS. More robots!

What is the  ITU? What does it mean for the future of the Internet? https://whatistheitu.org

thekidshouldseethis:

At a Portland TEDx event, Oregonian Joe Smith demonstrates how to use a paper towel, and moreover, demonstrates how easy it is to be mindful. Everyone should see this!

via Kottke.

thekidshouldseethis:

There are two dromedary camels that live in Arizona that are now internet famous: their names are Nessie and Baby. You can tell that they are Dromedary or Arabian camels because they have only one hump (vs two. And, despite cartoon lore, they do not store water in it, but they do drink a lot of water.) 

Nessie and Baby get brushed and cuddled, they race, and they run from “dangerous” plastic bins, among many other activities like pineapple eating

Baby and Nessie are just two of the animals at Camels and Friends.